Tag Archive | Eleanor Cameron

Top Ten (ish) Lesser-Known Books I Love

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Late to the party, as usual… It was still Tuesday a few minutes ago, anyway… *cough*

This week’s prompt for Top Ten Tuesday (hosted by The Broke & the Bookish) is to share our top ten lesser-known books — specifically, books with less than 2,000 ratings on Goodreads.

This is one I was really curious to try! So I sorted my Goodreads shelves by the number of rating, and wrote down ones I loved that had less than 2K ratings, and it was fascinating to see.

I have a bit of a dilemma though, because many of the ones that I love that are “lesser known” as far as number of Goodreads ratings are actually more known in my circles and/or I’ve talked about before.

I could pick books I usually rave about, like Illusionarium, Paper Crowns, Broken Glass & Corroded Thorns, The Word Changers, Blood Ties, Orphan’s Song, The Blood of Kings Trilogy, Kestrel’s Midnight Song, Plenilune (for Dammerung, you understand), The Book of Sight; I could go on and on…

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All of those are beloved books I’ve read, mostly by authors I semi-know, and all of which (I think) I’ve talked at length about how much I love, before this, and all of which released in the last decade or so.

I love them, and I highly recommend them, and if you haven’t read one or all of them, I demand highly suggest you read them at once because they’re awesome!

But older books have made a great impression on me, and these are lesser-known ones that I don’t talk about much or at all, so I’d like to highlight them today. šŸ™‚

(I’m also going to cheat a little and do more than 10 because I can’t help myself. *cough*)

(Also, also, please forgive the rambling quality of this post, since I wrote it in rather a hurry very late at night and I don’t think my brain is all here… Ahem. I know it’s a mess and I should edit it before posting this but I’m too tired to fix it right now.)

In no particular order… Underrated books I love.

The Pirate’s Son – Geraldine McCaughrean

This is one of my favorite books ever, and I know that it’s weird and probably not everyone’s cup of tea, but I adored it. It’s in the 1700s and about an English boy and his sister who end up traveling with an awesome boy named Tamo who happens to be a pirate’s son, to Madagascar, where they live with natives and meet nasty pirates and… I don’t even know. I’ve read it like three times. I randomly got it at a library sale (I think because I liked Peter Pan in Scarlet by the same author?) and fell in love with it and I doubt anyone else would even like it but… it’s one of my favorites and I got addicted to this author and need to try more by her. Speaking of which…

The Death-Defying Pepper Roux – Geraldine McCaughrean

I read this a few years back, and, if I’m going to be honest, I don’t remember this book very well. All I know is it was one of the strangest books I ever read and I adored it to smithereens. There was this boy named Pepper Roux who thought he was going to die when he turns 14 and there was a lot of running around with pursuits and I think there were candles and scaffolding and back alleys and ships and a best friend I think and it’s all from the unreliable narrator point-of-view of the hero and… yeah. That’s what’s in it. I think. I could be totally wrong though because honestly it’s terrifying how little I remember about this. I very much need to get it from the library again and reread it. I just love this author. She’s brilliant.

A Room Made of Windows – Eleanor Cameron

I might think differently of it now if I reread it, I don’t know, but this is another favorite from when I was younger… it just really resonated with me at the time. It’s hard to describe the plot since there isn’t a lot of one… It’s just a historical fiction about a girl in I think the early 190os (could be wrong… I don’t remember) and her family and the strange people who live in their neighborhood, and she’s a bit of a writer and very accident prone and… I don’t know. I just liked it. Plus it’s illustrated by my favorite illustrator, Trina Schart Hyman. Which is cool. I discovered this book because I loved the author’s Mushroom Planet books, which are fabulous by the way.

The Court of the Stone Children – Eleanor Cameron

This book was SO. COOL. I seriously need to reread it. It’s sort of a mystery and a lot of it takes place at a museum thing and there’s an ancient mystery to solve and the heroine, who’s just a normal girl, meets this other girl who… well, I guess she’s a ghost but that sounds creepy when I put it that way but it’s NOT, I promise, and she’s a French girl from the time of Napoleon and the heroine needs to help her solve a hundreds-of-years-old mystery involving a statue and a journal and a painting and a murder I think… Again, I don’t remember it all that well, I just know I really loved it, especially because there was this awesome boy who was really cool whose name was Gil. He was all mysterious. Anyways, a lot of these books are hard to describe but for some reason I really enjoyed them and they’re kind of unknown, so. *shrug*

The Golden Key – George MacDonald

I CAN’T EVEN DESCRIBE THIS. It’s a fantasy story, quite short actually, and… I don’t even know. I just know I loved it and felt like it was probably really deep and meaningful but I couldn’t… quite… REACH it if you know what I mean. I love books that are like that. Anyways it’s like this fairytale thing and I adored it and need to read it again. (I’m seeing a trend here…)

The Day Boy and the Night Girl – George MacDonald

Okay, so I ADORE this story. It’s an original fairytale sort of story, about this evil lady who raised this boy to be awake in the daytime and fear the night, and this girl to be awake at night and fear the day, and how they end up meeting and having to guide each other through the day or night, whichever is their element and not the other’s and… I don’t know, it’s just AWESOME and I love it.

The Father Brown Mysteries – G. K. Chesterton

I own an omnibus collection of all 5 books (plus an extra short story) of Father Brown, totaling 51 short stories in all, which I picked up when a friend was getting rid of some books. I just love the Father Brown stories! Especially the ones with criminal/criminal-turned-detective, Flambeau, who’s a great friend of Father Brown. I enjoy mysteries but I don’t usually have enough patience for a full novel-length one, so mystery short stories are my favorite, and these were all so unique and awesome. Father Brown is such a unique and unexpected detective, so unassuming but smart and also humble… He just IS. And pair him with clever mysteries and my favorite character Flambeau and they’re just awesome stories with this great “feel” to them. I just really enjoy them and I’ve read the entire collection at least twice and want to read it again. To me, they’re right up there with the classic Holmes stories as far as mysteries go.

David Balfour (a.k.a. Catriona) by Robert Louis Stevenson

Considering how popular Kidnapped is, and a classic at that, I’m extremely surprised how few people seem to know about and/or have read the sequel! Kidnapped is one of my favorites due to the Scottishness and the friendship between Davy and Alan Breck Stewart (not to mention the character himself). But in my mind, I consider Kidnapped and the sequel to be the same story, just chopped in half. David Balfour (or, the title it was published under in England I believe, Catriona, referring to the heroine of the story) picks up directly after Kidnapped ends, like… literally the same day if I remember right. It deals with Davy’s adventures afterward, including some wrapping up stuff from the first book, Davy meeting a singular young woman and their story, and Alan even returns for a couple more adventures in the book. It’s sometimes odd and I have a feeling while I’m reading it that most of the story goes over my head, likely because it was written so long ago and Stevenson and authors like that were so genius, but I still really enjoy it and consider it Kidnapped: Part 2, myself. It’s a shame more people haven’t read it because more Davy and Alan is awesome, not to mention it’s neat that Davy finally finds love. I mean, all the movie adaptions like to slip a girl into the Kidnapped story, so why not just read further to find it? šŸ˜‰ But it’s more epicness and Scottishness and Alan so what is not to love? Mostly Alan. Because Alan.

The Boggart and the Monster – Susan Cooper

This is another lesser-known sequel. I couldn’t put “The Boggart” on this list, since it has over 2K ratings on Goodreads… but I really loved that book, and was so incredibly excited to find out there was a sequel and read it! In this one, the hero and heroine from modern-day Canada go back to Scotland and meet up with old friends from the first book, and there’s all sorts of fun and awesomeness and the Loch Ness Monster (except not scary, just really really cool) and the Boggart himself again, and Tommy Cameron is the best and that is all.

The Facts and Fictions of Minna Pratt – Patricia MacLachlan

This one’s weird because it’s modern and I like it. It’s by the author of Sarah, Plain and Tall, and I randomly picked it up at a library sale because it looked interesting. I don’t know, there’s just this really neat feel to the story and it’s about a girl who plays cello and her mom’s a writer, and a boy who likes frogs and is from a rich family and… I don’t know that there’s much PLOT exactly, but I just love it so much. It’s the best. Like… I hardly like any straightforward contemporaries but this one is so perfect. (I just wish Goodreads had my edition up… which it doesn’t. The cover on the one I have is so much more adorbz than the cover I’m using here from Goodreads.)

Prince Valiant – Hal Foster

I grew up reading these in the funnies page of the newspaper, and I love reading the book collections whenever I can find them. Prince Valiant is quite simply THE most epic thing ever, and the ultimate King Arthur thing for me. The illustrations are my favorite ever, the characters are awesome, the adventures so fun and epic… IT IS BASICALLY MY FAVORITE THING OF EVER. <333 I know it’s technically still going but I don’t read the papers anymore… so I don’t know if it’s still awesome or not, especially going through new authors and everything and some of the storylines were getting weird last I knew, but the old books are simply AWESOME.

Dominic – William Steig

This boooook! ā¤ It’s about Dominic, a dog, who sets out on an adventure through the world he lives in which is inhabited by various animals who are basically like people and live in houses and all that. He has so many awesome adventures and is so heroic and finds treasure and rescues other animals along the way and fights against the feared Doomsday Gang, a collection of weasels, ferrets, foxes etc. who are nasty, and… just… he’s super epic. I love Dominic and this book and it’s the best. If you think you’re too old for animal stories? You’re not. READ THIS ONE. It has something for everyone. I just love it. It’s also illustrated by the author, which is super cool.

The Whisper of Glocken – Carol Kendall

For anyone who knows about The Gammage Cup… this is its sequel. It’s about a new set of Minipin heroes who have to set out to save The Land Between the Mountains. I wanted to put The Gammage Cup on this list but turns out it has over 2,000 ratings… which is good because it means more people have read it, but… anyway, I’m putting the sequel here. I didn’t love it as much as The Gammage Cup, but of course, there are few books I do… At any rate, it’s quite different but also just really awesome and I just LOVE this book. The characters are so fun and the adventures are original and you won’t see them coming. And the whole Glocken whisper thing… I just… I love. ā¤

Hear the whisper, whisper, whisper,
That lost and far-off whisper,
And remember, member, member,
The whisper of Glocken’s . . . bell.

The Rocket’s Shadow (Rick Brant Science Adventures) – John Blaine

Anyone who loves old adventure stories like The Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, Tom Swift… well, I do too, but the Rick Brant books were my favorites of the old books like that. I just LOVE them. Rick Brant and his friend Scotty (who was in the Marines and so Knows Stuff) are some of the bestest buddies ever and they have epic adventures all around the world and it’s great. I just love these. The first one’s my favorite because it’s when Rick and Scotty meet. And it’s just a cool adventure/mystery trying to track down people who are trying to sabotage the rocket Rick’s father and people are making. It’s like the Hardy Boys, only even better. šŸ™‚

The Sign of the Seven Seas – Carley Dawson

Apparently this is a super rare book… which is sad because that means not everyone can read it. šŸ˜¦ But I found it at a garage sale for a quarter and it’s a 1700s story with evil pirates, largely on the high seas but a bit in colonial America and the jungles of Mexico, and there’s awesome characters who are the best, and the hero’s from modern times but went back in time, and magical goings-on and forbidden love and the hero turns into an adorable fluffy puppy at one point and there’s a cool character named Osterbridge Hawseye who’s kind of like Zorro or the Scarlet Pimpernel simply because he’s cool but pretends to be a fop, and there’s a creepy blind man who’s not blind and some pickles I think and a magical rope and Mr. Wicker who is one of the coolest people ever and I just ADORE it. *hugs book for eternity*

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And… great, now I want to go reread all of these. šŸ˜› Have you read any of them? What are lesser-known favorites of yours? šŸ™‚

Thanks for reading!

Dream away in those pages . . .

~The Page Dreamer

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TTT: Book Categories to Read More Of In 2016

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I’m linking up with Top Ten Tuesday (from The Broke and the Bookish) because I love lists and I love books and this weekly meme is all about both. So join in if you like!

Today’s prompt is: Top Ten Resolutions We Have For 2015, which I’m putting a slight twist on.

I want to read more of these ten categories, and I’m listing some books in each category that I want to read soon if I can. (Yes, this makes for over 50, and I’m only scratching the surface… What can I say? There are a lot of books I want to read…)

Here they are, in no particular order. (Also, I’m too tired to link to all the books, but they’re all on my Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/DeborahOCarroll)

Steampunk

I discovered Steampunk last year (I’ve read three so far) and I really want to continue with the genre!

steampunk

The Mark of the Dragonfly // Airborn // The Locket Thief // Larklight // Leviathan

Heists

I also discovered heists/con-artist-y books last year, and they’re fun to read, just for the cleverness of them. I have some I’d like to read that are contemporary, and some medieval fantasy… a bit of everything.

heists

Artemis Fowl: The Arctic Incident // The Heist // The Thief Lord // The Thief // Montmorency: Thief, Liar, Gentleman?

High Fantasy

I really miss medieval/high fantasy. I used to read a lot of it… Most of what I read used to be in this category, but I haven’t in awhile, so I’d like to get back into it.

highfantasy

The Riddle // Ranger’s Apprentice: The Ruins of Gorlan // In the Hall of the Dragon King // King’s Warrior // Moonblood

Historical Romance

I’m not much of a historical/regency-type romance reader, but I’ve gathered a few that I’d like to get around to. (Especially Georgette Heyer and Melanie Dickerson!)

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Northanger Abbey // Wuthering Heights // Mist of Midnight // The Healer’s Apprentice // Devil’s Cub

Mysteries

I do love a good mystery — especially short stories — and don’t read enough of them.

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Father Brown (reread) // Double Sin // Sherlock Holmes (reread) // The Red House Mystery (reread) // Lord Peter

Flintlock Fantasy/1700s/Historical Fantasy

This is rather thrown together with a lot of categories, but I love the eighteenth-century setting with muskets and all, and if it has fantasy thrown in, all the better. I’m not real particular about whether it’s set in our world or another, just give me all the muskets and tricorn hats! (Pirates or Highwaymen are, apparently, a plus.)

1700s

Thieftaker // Piratica // The Highwayman’s Footsteps // Captain Blood // The Accidental Highwayman

Retellings

I love a good retelling, whether it be of a fairytale, or Robin Hood or Arthurian.

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The Ryn {snow white and rose red} // Cruel Beauty {beauty and the beast} // Hood {robin hood} // The Perilous Gard {tam lin} // The Night Dance {arthurian/twelve dancing princesses}

Favorite Authors

Sometimes in a rush for the new, I put off books by authors I already love… even though I’m already fairly certain the books will be fabulous, especially when they’re by authors such as: Diana Wynne Jones, P.G. Wodehouse, Geraldine McCaughrean, Eleanor Cameron.

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Julia’s Magic // A Tale of Time City // The Tough Guide to Fantasyland // The Glorious Adventures of the Sunshine Queen // The Code of the Woosters

Tolkien (Yes, this is a category in itself.)

As my favorite author, I have several books by or about J.R.R. Tolkien which I’ve not read yet, and I’d like to read some of them soon.

tolkien

The Maps of Tolkien’s Middle-earth // Sauron Defeated // The Fall of Arthur // The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien // Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Rereads

There are so many good books I’ve read that I miss and want to revisit, or don’t remember. These are just a few…

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Westmark {Westmark Trilogy} // The Book of Three {Prydain Chronicles} // The Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet {Mushroom Planet series} // The Dark Hills Divide {Land of Elyon} // The Dark is Rising {The Dark is Rising Sequence} // The Gammage Cup // The Chronicles of Narnia // Ronia, the Robber’s Daughter // Mara, Daughter of the Nile // The Lord of the Rings (and the Silmarilion) // By Darkness Hid {Blood of Kings Trilogy}

Bonus

I’d also like to read more non-fiction, more e-books, and a few Star Wars, as well as go to the library more often.

Are there book categories you’d like to read more of?

What are your 2016 bookish resolutions?

~

Dream away in those pages!